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College Admissions: Handling Early Admission Rejection

Monday, December 16, 2013

 

It's not what you want to see but it just might arrive--how to handle early decision rejections as well as deferrals

For many seniors around the country, early admission returns have begun to roll in. For some, it is a time of exuberance because they have been accepted to their first choice college. But for others, it is a time

of exasperation over deferrals, or worse, disappointment over rejection. However, there are things you can do to soften the disappointment and create the best opportunity for acceptances in the spring.

For Deferred Students 

While this is disappointing, it is important to remember that a deferral is NOT a rejection. It is a good idea to show your continued interest in a few ways now: 

  • Forward updates to colleges when you receive awards, team captain titles, have something published, etc.
  • If a college is you first choice, write a nice note to admissions saying that you were disappointed, but that if you are accepted in the spring, you will attend. This assures the college that you are "yield-able" which is important.
  • Make sure that your guidance office sends new grades when they come out.
  • If you have any new SAT or ACT scores, make sure that you have them sent from the CollegeBoard or ACT as soon as they are available.

 

For Rejected Students 

Handling rejection is never easy. It’s understandable if a student is sad for a few days, but lingering in despair for longer than that is not a good idea. It’s time to focus on the positive, and reassess your strategy. First, post every acceptance you have received on the fridge or somewhere visible. Then, go online and find 3 things that you like, but didn't know about each college where you were accepted. It helps reinforce the positive and keeps you from getting bogged down in the negative.

Second, take a hard look at your college list and regular decision schools. If you have Naviance at your school, review scattergrams and make sure that you are looking at schools where students in your academic range have been accepted in past years. If you don’t have access to scattergams, speak with your guidance counselor or invest in a private college advisor to make sure that your choices are realistic. Books and Web sites that list average GPAs and SAT ranges can be very deceiving, especially for elite schools. I don’t recommend that you use those to gauge your chances. Then, if you discover that you have been shooting too high, it’s time to add some additional backup and reasonable schools to you list. File those apps over your holiday vacation, and make sure that you don’t miss January 1 deadlines. 

Remember this

It’s important to remember that very few students get accepted to ALL their colleges. It is a hard part of the process to be rejected from your top choice college, but often one that ends up being a winning path in life. Many famous people, including news anchors, business moguls and Nobel Laureates were rejected from their first choice college. The Wall St. Journal ran a wonderful piece a few years ago that chronicled several, all of whom attributed their success to where they ended up in college.

Wherever you end up in college, you alone have the power to determine your own happiness and your own success. Going to a big name college is not a guaranteed meal ticket today—in any way shape or form. You can get a great education at most colleges and universities in the U.S. if you seek out the best courses, professors and internships--- and if you are driven to succeed! 

Cristiana Quinn, M.Ed. is the founder of College Admission Advisors, LLC which provides strategic, individual counseling for college-bound students. www.collegeadvisorsonline.com


Related Slideshow:
RI 4 Year Colleges & Universities with the Highest Student Debt

Seven in 10 college seniors (71%) who graduated last year had student loan debt, with an average of $29,400 per borrower, according to a new report released by the Institute for College Access and Success. According to the Institute’s Project on Student Debt, Rhode Island has the fifth highest student debt in the country, but what about the state's individual institutions? Check out the slides below to see the average debt graduates accrued at Rhode Island colleges and universities.

Note: All data is based on four-year or above institutions for students graduating in the 2011-2012 academic year. Johnson and Wales University and the Rhode Island School of Design are not included in the data below, because they did not report the average debt of their graduates.

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#7 Rhode Island College

Average Student Debt: $23,110

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 79%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 11%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 1,307

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 5,794

In-State Tuition and Fees: $7,268

Total Cost of Attendance: $18,964

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 36%

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#6 Brown University

Average Student Debt: $23,521

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 37%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 45%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 1,603

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 6,114

In-State Tuition and Fees: $42, 230

Total Cost of Attendance: $56,150

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 14%

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#5 Providence College

Average Student Debt: $26,832

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 70%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 21%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 914

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 3,804

In-State Tuition and Fees: $40,975

Total Cost of Attendance: $54,840

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 16%

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#4 Univ. of Rhode Island

Average Student Debt: $30,387

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 77%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 31%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 2,614

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 11,672

In-State Tuition and Fees: $11,366

Total Cost of Attendance: $25,311

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 24%

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#3 Roger Williams Univ.

Average Student Debt: $38,550

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 66%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 39%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 872

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 3,834

In-State Tuition and Fees: $30,908

Total Cost of Attendance: $47,568

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: N/A

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#2 Salve Regina Univ.

Average Student Debt: $39,996

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 80%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 33%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 436

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 1,904

In-State Tuition and Fees: $32,800

Total Cost of Attendance: $47,100

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 24%

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#1 Bryant University

Average Student Debt: $44,580

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 88%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 53%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 831

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 3,211

In-State Tuition and Fees: $34,624

Total Cost of Attendance: $50,153

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 17%

 
 

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